New Interventional Radiology Suite Unveiled


Vol. 9, No. 3
December, 1999

  • External Beam Radiation Therapy Makes a Quantum Leap

  • Ambulatory Surgery Unit Expands

  • New Island Hospital Breaks Ground

  • Winthrop is Y2K Ready

  • Indigo Laser Relieves Symptoms of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis Study

  • Dr. Scott Named Heart Association President

  • New Interventional Radiology Suite Unveiled

  • Mammotome® Breast Biopsy Procedure

  • Drug May Help Prevent Lung and Brain Damage in Premature Babies

  • Winthrop Nurses Never Stop Learning

  • Clinical Trial for Pancreatic Cancer

  • Winthrop: A Center for Lifesaving Autologous Stem Cell Transplants

  • Carnival in Venice Benefits Winthrop

  • John Broder Named Businessperson of the Year

  • Yuletide Ball

  • Winthrop’s Ninth Annual Flu Immunization Program Reached 1,500 Senior Citizens

  • Teens for Tots/Teen Angels’ Donation to Child Life Program

  • Winthrop’s Deserving Volunteers Receive Awards

  • Volunteers Needed at Winthrop

  • Visiting Scholar from Taiwan Studies at Winthrop

  • For Long Island Children who don't have Health Insurance

  • Copyright

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  • Patient Elizabeth Schweitzer undergoes a pulmonary angiography in Winthrop's new Interventional Radiology Suite, performed by Sidney Glanz, MD, (R), Chief, Interventional Radiology, and Mariam Moshiri, MD (L).


    Winthrop strengthened its commitment to state-of-the-art technology with the recent development of a $2 million Interventional Radiology Suite. This new facility provides the most advanced digital fluoroscopy equipment to image veins, arteries, and ducts in order to diagnose and treat conditions ranging from peripheral vascular disease to aortic aneurysms. The new suite updates the existing Interventional Radiology Suite. With two specially equipped rooms now available to handle patients, many of whom require studies on an emergency basis, the Hospital’s capacity is effectively doubled.

    “Image resolution with the new equipment is superior to what was available and image acquisition is much faster, enabling us to perform studies in less time and with greater visualization of internal structures,” said Sidney Glanz, MD, Chief of Interventional Radiology at Winthrop.

    Interventional radiology involves injecting contrast dye through a catheter placed in a vein, artery, or duct in order to image the structure. The technique can be used diagnostically, but it also has treatment applications. For example, blood clots in the extremities that can occur with peripheral vascular disease can be viewed and dissolved with the introduction of thrombolytics - clot-busting medications delivered through the catheter directly into the vein or artery. In addition, blood vessels that are narrowed or blocked can be opened with balloon angioplasty or vascular stents.

    Neuroradiologists also use the technique to precisely image structures in the brain, head and neck, and spine. This is useful for pre-operative studies of the carotid artery, which carries blood to the brain. Patients with blockages in the carotid are at extremely high risk for stroke. Vascular surgeons can open narrowed carotid arteries with a procedure known as carotid endarterectomy.

    Expanded MRI Hours
    Need an MRI? Winthrop has extended its MRI service hours:

    Monday - Thursday:
    8:00 AM - 12 midnight

    Friday:
    8:00 AM - 8:00 PM

    Saturday and Sunday:
    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    For further information or to schedule an appointment, call Monday - Friday, 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM, at (516) 663-2062.

    “The new suite provides us with simultaneous bi-plane angiography, which means that we can simultaneously see two views at a 90 degree angle to one another,” said Donald Price, MD, Chief of Neuroradiology. “The equipment is digital, which enhances image quality.”

    “Interventional radiology procedures are minimally invasive,” said Interventional Radiologist Manny Hon, MD. “They involve smaller incisions, less pain, and shorter hospital stays, and are therefore generally less costly and less traumatic to the patient.”

    Nearly 2,600 interventional radiology procedures were performed at Winthrop in 1998, according to Michael Luyckx, Administrative Director, Imaging Services. “This new equipment dramatically expands our capability to provide this type of care to the many inpatients and outpatients who need it.”

    In addition to five Board certified interventional radiologists, including three neuroradiologists, the suite is staffed by New York State-licensed Special Procedures Technologists, and specially trained registered nurses.

    For additional information, call Mr. Luyckx at (516) 663-3510.



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