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A Mother’s Gratitude

Tracey Mallory is overcome by gratitude as she holds her newborn son, Evan – gratitude for her new bundle of joy, and for the doctors who saved both of their lives.

At 39 weeks pregnant, Mrs. Mallory had already suffered through a host of complications. Just four weeks earlier, she fainted on the streets of New York City as she was walking to work and was diagnosed with postural hypotension – a condition characterized by a sudden drop in blood pressure, causing a person to pass out. Mrs. Mallory also had fibroids, and her baby was in a transverse position (on his side). She was planning to have a procedure that would involve turning the baby so that she could deliver naturally.

A compliance and standards supervisor at Canon Inc., Mrs. Mallory was getting prenatal care close to her workplace in Manhattan and was planning to deliver at a hospital there.

Joseph Cioffi, MD, Director of the Division of Ob/Gyn Hospitalists at Winthrop, holds Evan Mallory just three days after he was born. Joining him is Evan’s mother, Tracey Mallory, who is deeply appreciative for the outstanding care she received at Winthrop that saved both her and her son’s life.
But Mrs. Mallory’s plans changed in an instant on January 11, 2012, when she suddenly started bleeding and having contractions while at home on Long Island. Concerned that she did not have time to make the trip into New York City to see her doctor, she and her husband, Carl Mallory, went to Winthrop, only minutes away from their home in Hempstead.

As soon as she entered the Hospital, Mrs. Mallory was taken to Labor and Delivery and was promptly examined by Arin Buresch, MD, Acting Chief Resident in Ob/Gyn.

“Mrs. Mallory was in active labor, and I explained that she needed to have an emergency C-section. Though her plan had been for the baby to be turned so she could deliver naturally, there was just no time,” said Dr. Buresch. Dr. Buresch told Mrs. Mallory that if she decided to travel to New York City, she would be putting both her and her baby’s lives in danger.

Recognizing the urgency of the situation and confident in the care she would receive at Winthrop, Mrs. Mallory agreed to undergo an emergency C-section. She was immediately brought into the Operating Room, where Joseph Cioffi, MD, Director, Division of Ob/Gyn Hospitalists at Winthrop, was on hand to perform the surgery.

“Dr. Cioffi calmed me in a situation in which the waters were not still,” Mrs. Mallory said.

As he began the procedure, Dr. Cioffi discovered that a number of fibroids were wrapped around Mrs. Mallory’s uterus, covering her baby in a way that was posing a significant threat to both her and her baby. After Dr. Cioffi removed four fibroids, he opened Mrs. Mallory’s amniotic sac and saw another complication – Mrs. Mallory had had a placental abruption, a complication of pregnancy in which the placental lining separates from the mother’s uterus, causing blood to fill up inside of the amniotic sac.

“Both Mrs. Mallory’s condition and her baby’s condition were deteriorating rapidly, precipitating the need for rapid emergency delivery,” said Dr. Cioffi. “Mrs. Mallory came to Winthrop at just the right time.”

Dr. Cioffi, alongside a team consisting of a board certified anesthesiologist, a nursing circulator, a surgical technician, neonatal intensive care nurses and physicians, worked diligently to get the baby out safely while also treating Mrs. Mallory’s conditions. Soon after Mrs. Mallory heard Evan cry for the first time, Dr. Cioffi explained that he had to be taken to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for monitoring because he had swallowed blood in utero. Dr. Cioffi was then able to finish the operation without performing a hysterectomy – the usual result of a placental abruption.

“They worked on me with such care and such grace, and they never let the stress that they were under show,” she said. “The entire team worked together like a well oiled machine.”

Following the operation, Mrs. Mallory spent 24 hours in the recovery room while Evan stayed in the NICU, where he was monitored by an outstanding team of neonatologists and nurses for three days.

Three days later, both Evan and Mrs. Mallory were discharged from the Hospital in good health. Mr. and Mrs. Mallory are so thankful that they sought care at Winthrop.

“Winthrop is known as a leading hospital on Long Island. You don’t just get that reputation – you earn it,” Mr. Mallory said.

“Had Mrs. Mallory attempted the possibly two hour trip to New York City, her baby would have died from complications, and she might have died as well from loss of blood. Her acute situation emphasizes how important it is for women to immediately seek prompt medical attention from the right institution when complications arise,” Dr. Cioffi said.

“The care at Winthrop was beyond comparison. Without a doubt, Dr. Cioffi saved my life and Evan’s life, and for this I will be forever grateful,” said Mrs. Mallory.

Mrs. Mallory’s story reflects why Winthrop is a designated New York State Regional Perinatal Center (RPC) – a prestigious designation that recognizes the Hospital’s ability to deliver the highest level of obstetrical and perinatal care – because the Hospital is equipped to handle the most complicated pregnancies and high-risk deliveries.

More than 4,000 babies begin their lives each year in Winthrop’s familyfriendly New Life Center. While the ambiance in the New Life Center is tranquil, expectant moms and dads can feel secure in the knowledge that the sophisticated technology and vast resources of a major teaching hospital are close at hand should a complication develop.

For more information on obstetric and gynecological services at Winthrop, call 1-866-WINTHROP.
Vol. 22, No. 1
Winter/Spring 2012

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